Author: stellaathletics

Stella hosts Walking Clinic with Natalie le Roux

By Sharon Troll

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Early Saturday morning a bunch of eager walkers from as far as Hilton attended the Walking Clinic given by Natalie le Roux.

She shared her truely inspirational life story, some of her future goals, nutrition, how to train for a race and a little bit about KZN Masters Athletics before taking us through the warm up routine. Boy was that difficult!!! ‘Pulling the line from your navel’, ‘rocking the baby’, ‘loosening those hips’ and ‘activating the shins’ made us all look at bit silly, but we soon saw the benefits of all these movements.

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After a few stretching exercises we walked up to Bulwer Park where Natalie explained how we should approach the up hills and downhills, and some other techniques. We did a couple of rounds in the park showing off our new moves.

The clinic was enjoyed by all and several walkers showed interest in future events. So watch this space.

Thanks to Natalie for sharing your knowledge in such a humble way. 

Thanks to Jodi Pastorino from KZNMA for joining us.

Thanks to Stella Athletic Club for hosting the clinic.

Thanks to Michael Mostert who took the initiative in asking for a donation towards the Elders Voice and thanks to everyone who gave from the heart.

I’ll end with a very appropriate saying coming from our own Frankie…

WALK WITH PURPOSE!!

Mtunzini Trail Run 2019

By: Michael Mostert

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Michael, Maureen and Sam at the end of the trail run

It was that time of the year when the beauty of Umlalazi Nature Reserve called me back to tackle the not one, but two day trail hosted  by Mtunzini AC.

I decided to do the two day race with my ankle conversing with me in fluent Gaelic. “Remember your history with trail runs and also remember you just recovered from a broken ankle, break dancing down the wet steps” I said to myself. Weighing up my options and waking up with my trail run nightmares and cold sweats,  I entered the two day Bushbaby Whacker  which compromised of 15km on day one and 10 km on day two.

The day dawned as we all gathered around burning fire baskets in nervous chatter. It was great to see the friendly faces of other Stella peeps who like me were tackling the whacker. We lined up in our multi coloured regalia and camel packs stocked enough for Mount Kilimanjaro.  “Yho! these trail runners are serious, what have I got myself on for” I thought.…

The race set off at 7 am to the start of a fish eagle call. I lined up with fellow Stella crazies, Samantha and Maureen, as we headed into the green forest of the reserve. Maureen and Sam bounded down the hill like impala being hunted by Cheetah. We headed through a section of  the golf course safely and entered into the most beautiful scenery of forest paths, fallen yellow leaves, wooden walk ways, bridge crossings, and trees as we meandered through the foot paths and the tush-aching beach section. The beach was breath taking, even the cold shark infested water looked inviting to cool down burning glutes. My time was slow as I helped out a young fellow runner with an Achilles tendon injury, but bounded off like a hare to the finish line another 7 km away ….

After two hours of awesome trails we headed up to the finish which felt like a category 1 climb on the Tour De France. We crawled over the finish line to family and friends welcoming us home. That was day one, day two was a sight to see as those who did day one were lined up with aching muscles. It was a comedy of errors seeing those, including myself, hobble down the hill with moans and groans. Some of us literally looked like crabs running back into the ocean with stiff legs. This time we hobbled past the fairway and no stray golf balls to worry about as a drone hovered above. We entered the cool forest again with odd sightings of Duiker, Zebra and Mongoose ..

At least for the 10km option there was no beach section, thank goodness. I went to see the 15 km route and the size of the beach dune they had to traverse up, which was not for the faint hearted!

All in all, I had two awesome days on two different routes and recommend this race as a must for all Stella runners. You can arrange a weekend getaway in the camp site with other clubs or stay in one of the many chalets and BnBs in the tranquil village of Mtunzini. Highly recommended!

Stella Accolades September Edition

By Sandy Mullins

Stella is a club of many talented athletes, and in varying degrees, not necessarily in speed, but also in endurance, grit, stickability and character. This month we applaud the following Stella members for their achievements!

Jadi Clark

“Baker girl, Baker girl

Run us a race

Go to the island and pick up the pace!”

And this is what she did! Not only did Jadi Clark have a brilliant run at Comrades, being the first Stella lady in at an amazing time of 07:37, she then, a few weeks later ran the Mauritius Marathon on the 19th July, and achieved first position in a time of 3:17!

This lovely, effervescent lady is a real credit to the club, and we salute and recognise Jadi for the discipline and effort she puts in! 

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Gcina Msibi

A novice runner he was this year, but novice times NOT as nothing stopped this speedster from achieving times most of us only dream about. Gcina Msibi joined Stella and we have not looked back! A gentleman with a smile on his face, we have watched as he pushed himself to the limits to achieve the goals he had set for himself. With over 2 500kms on his feet this year, his first Comrades was a Silver medal in a time of 7:02, and recently he did the Cape Town City Marathon in a time of 2:38. Gcina – you are an absolute star and we applaud you for who you are and what you have achieved. 

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Kim Clunas-Bonorchis

Not all Stella Stars are athletes. This lady may not physically run the miles her hubby does, but she puts in as much effort, if not more to support and second him, as well as every Stella runner on the road! Kim Bonorchis is a familiar face many a runner has seen while on training runs or races, and she is an absolute breath of fresh air as she encourages with words and actions to get us to the end. She offers advice as well as drinks, meds and other necessities that are in good supply. She’s up at the crack of dawn carting runners, and on the side of the road with a smile and her iPhone in hand snapping photos as we trundle along. On one occasion this year on a training run, she injured herself while crossing the road to a support table right at the beginning of the run. We were none the wiser as she popped up on many occasions along the way – 56ks! Only later did we find out that she was injured – but not a moan! Kim your efforts at Stella have not gone unnoticed, and you will be sorely missed as you leave for the UK. We appreciate everything you have done. You are a true STAR!

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Comrades Stars!

By Sandy Mullins

62164650_10156381464070677_5865265055188123648_o.jpgSo many athletes did well at Comrades this year. Everyone who received a medal can pat themselves on the back. But just to highlight a few runners who need a mention.

Edmond Mngadi, Shane Hinchliffe and Pat Freeman all obtained their treble green numbers.  That is an amazing accomplishment. Thirty times going up and down equates to about 2 600 km’s and not to mention the years of training! Following close behind is Garry Mann on 29, Helen Mann on 27 and Gina Hinchliffe on 26. Vino Pillay and Annie Harmsworth have 25 each. Only two other current Stella members have done more than 30, Pat Fisher who finished her 31st this year and Phillip van Niekerk who has finished 32. Kudos also goes to Ivan Charles who obtained his 20th and Moses Ngcobo who received his green number. 

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Our golden girl – Jadi Clark ran a remarkable 07:37 earning herself the new Isavel Roche-Kelly medal. All the training and hours of hard work paid off! 

An amazing accomplishment by one of our novices comes in the form of Gcina Msibi, who cracked a 7:02 for his first effort and a piece of silver! 

And not to mention a man who does Iron Man the week before Comrades in a time of 5:17 and then finishes a week later with a Bill Rowan medal in a time of 8:34 – maybe you’re not a blonde after all! 

Well done Stella for lifting the flag high! 

The Flip side of Comrades

By: Sandy Mullins

9 June has come and gone, and many participants have positive experiences to share of their Comrades journey. Being at the Aches and Pains Braai afterwards was a testimony to the fact as runners hobbled around in their Comrades shirts, proudly displaying their hard-earned medals and sharing all their experiences. Each one deserving the limelight and soaking it up.

I hid behind my phone taking photos, so happy for our Stella Stars but wishing I was also experiencing the euphoria of the weekend. But in truth, all I wanted to do was flee to my bed and sob my heart out. For me, it was the utter disappointment of another DNF. Life is quite seriously unfair. 

I was so ready for this day. I could tick off all the necessary requirements of a safe finish. I’d trained with discipline and didn’t hesitate to run and clock up 1300k’s of mileage. I was injury free; head was in the right space and I was eager to show the up run I was able to respectfully conquer. I took all the necessary precautions of not getting sick (Bactroban up the nose, throat spray, hand sanitizer and a dozen vitamins). It was a green light all the way until the Monday before Comrades! I picked up a gastro virus and puked my lungs out. I went to the doctor hoping to sort it out immediately. He gave me a jab for fever and nausea and tabs to take which would, with any luck sort me out in time. 

When I lined up at the Durban City Hall, I was feeling great. I had slept surprisingly well and was as calm and relaxed as could be. We set off and at first; I thought it was unusually warm. But by the time we were heading up Cowies, I said to my running mates, that I felt like I was overheating – the steam was coming from my head. Anyway, upwards we went, and I enjoyed the atmosphere in territory where you are guaranteed of seeing someone you know on the side of the road. It buoys you, and that friendly word of encouragement just spurs you on. I was still on track and despite feeling a bit bilious, I was okay. The Stella tables along the way were great and I got my replenishing Gu’s and Rehydrats to continue. At Inchanga I picked up my Crampnot, took it and left the table thinking, right this is progress – I have passed the spot I had to pull off two years ago. I had hardly started moving when the first cramps hit me like a bolt of lightning. No, this couldn’t be happening, not now in no man’s land! Harrison Flats is a desolate stretch at the best of times, but to have a problem was not ideal. My cramps came regularly in each calf and the left leg right up the inner thigh. It was excruciating. I felt like I was a Jewish slave in the Biblical times of the Pharaohs and a slave driver was whipping my legs shouting SUFFER! No God, this wasn’t meant to happen this way, we were doing this together! The more I tried to move, the more severe the cramps came. One young man from Tzaneen tried to assist by releasing the tension in my legs and would walk with me and help again. Eventually I told him to go as he was looking for his wife so he could pull out. As I hobbled along I realised I was in trouble, with another 30k’s to go and the Crampnot was not working, I didn’t see much option. Unfortunately, I hopped on to a baler bus – my race was over. Could I have gone further? Should I have waited? Why didn’t I try harder? Why was I the one plagued with a virus which had obviously not taken its tentacles off me? I had done a long training run of the same distance and not cramped once, so I knew it wasn’t anything but this bug. 

At the time I was okay with my decision and went to wait for Sean, David, Thanesh and John at Lion Park, with our Stella table – the selfless Sue Bezuidenhout and Vanessa Botha. I had made a friend on the bus and she also hopped out there to wait for her friends to collect her. We could not have stopped at a better spot, an oasis in the desert. We were given warm jackets, drink upon drink to try and quench an unquenchable thirst. They fussed over us and the other runners coming past. It was good for me to see my running mates and encourage them on, though they were all heartbroken to see me at the side of the road. 

A week later, having rehashed THAT day over and over again, I am coming to terms with it. I have been humbled, but I am not out. Is it such a big deal? Actually, YES – when you have invested half a year of sacrifice, and not only your time and all that goes with it, but my dear husband’s as well. Sean had backed me to the hilt, and it was just as much a team effort as it was my run! 

I know I am not alone in this experience and many can relate in one way or another. It is character building (I think I have enough character now!!) and we can only hope to inspire each one to achieve the goals they have set – whether it be a Park Run or Comrades, it’s to remain focused and all being well, we learn and grow. I will pick myself up out of the dust and I will return to run and complete the race, to attain the goal I have set for myself.

Stella Accolades

By Sandy Mullins

Stella is a club of many talented athletes, and in varying degrees, not necessarily in speed, but also in endurance, grit, stickability and character. Often achievements are made and they fly under the radar. So my aim is to acknowledge our Stars by highlighting their achievements and giving credit where credit is due. If you know of someone who you feel needs to be recognised, please send me a mail and we can honour our Stars. It could be coming “first” in your personal race against time, or achieving a goal that ticks off a bucket list. Or it could be the support and encouragement given to runners that makes this individual shine.  It will take time but we will do our best to make sure you do your best!

To kick-start the Accolades, here are a couple of Stars that have made an impact this year.


Stars to the Rescue!

By Sandy Mullins

Not every run planned goes according to plan! Saturday 23rd of Feb 2019, was one such run. A training run from the club had been planned, a tough Cowies Hill and back 32k, which under normal circumstances is challenging to say the least. We arrive at the club before 5:00 and start ambling up the road gearing up for the challenge. As we look up in the dawn light, a chap on a bicycle comes past us and we see Clay Bonorchis running towards us – shouting and gesticulating to the group to stop that guy – he’s just hijacked that bike off a mature cyclist doing an early morning ride. The next minute, Julian Robert followed by Clay go hurtling off, giving chase that would have given Usain Bolt a run for his money. The rest of us stunned, are not quite sure what to do now. Do we wait; do we carry on and hope that our two brave idiots are okay and catch up? We decided to continue slowly. About 4ks down, Kevin Hendrikse phoned Gabriel, our car guard at the club to find out if Clay and Julian had returned. They had and he told Clay to join us at 45th cutting if they were up to it. 

What had transpired was that they managed to catch up to the thief and eventually retrieved the bicycle, though the badly stunned crook managed to get away. They then took the bike to the club and gave it to the cyclist with a stern admonition from Clay. After having done a world record 2k’s or so – these two gents still proceeded to run up to Cowies and caught up with us! Absolute respect for our heroes – who did not hesitate to help in a time of need! 


Sam Mkhonto 

By Sandy Mullins

There are so many Stella members who fly under the radar, yet contribute so much to Stella. One amazing man is Sam Mkhonto, who has been running with the club for many years. He is over 60 and has ten Comrades under his belt, his best time being 8:51 and still continues to run credible times. But what is special about this gentleman is the encouragement he gives to other runners. Every week you see him and a few other athletes training in the park. At club runs, he comes alongside aspiring athletes and gently gives them advice and reinforcement. I went through a bad patch one year, and while running one day, this gentle presence came alongside me and gave me tips and pushed me through, when I was feeling as flat as a pancake. I know many have been touched by his encouragement. His passion for Stella and the runners is noticeable. Sam – you are a star of note and deserve to be recognised!

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Sharon Troll

By Sandy Mullins

This quiet, unassuming lady is a walker of note. She is part of the walking squad, though is quite able to run too!

In March this year, Sharon attended the KZN Masters Champs 5000 meter track events. On the Friday evening, she came second in her age category for the 5k walk in a time of 33:57, and to top it all, the next day did the 10k walk in 1:14, receiving silver medals for both events. 

Well done Sharon – you are a champ!!b03ac321-6d4b-4d60-8a43-784daab9aecf.jpg


Michael Mostert

By Dave Beattie

Mike Mostert is the epitome of a big man with a big heart. Not only is he our Walking Road Captain, but he is also the person who champions walking at club, race and league level. Nothing is too much effort for Mike and you will always see him in the middle of his gaggle of walkers. He is the person to whisper encouragement into a new walker’s ear and push his protégés to be the best that they can be.  He is certainly quick with a chirp and similarly fast on his feet. Mike is innovative in his training methods and is not scared to try and convert seasoned runners to the walking discipline. The Stella walking team would not have achieved the league wins that they have had without his excellent leadership, drive and encouragement. Mike is a great guy and huge asset to the club. 

Michael compressed

Two Oceans Race Report

By: Spencer-Rae Kerr

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It’s a chilly morning and still dark. Somehow, by fluke, we got a last minute Air BnB booking for a flat right by the start, so I do not have to cater for any travel time. I listen from my bed as the commentator reprimands the 21k runners for dawdling. “Come on 21’s; you are losing time!”, he repeats desperately. Either everyone is on a go-slow, or the traffic was terrible this morning. The 21k runners are let off in their seeding batches at 10-minute intervals.

The Ultra starts at 6:40. I walk out of the building at 6:35 and along the pedestrian walkway. Metal barricades separate me from a densely packed group of runners who are brimming with nervous energy. I’m in E batch, and I’m in no rush because all I need to do is to get to the end of the barricade and onto the road behind the other runners. I’m imagining the commentator reprimanding me, “come on 56’s, you are losing time!” but he doesn’t, and I am not, because the 56km runners all start at the same time and I know it’s going to take a while to get going. I get to where I need to be and think over my strategy. I remind myself not to go out too fast – 56km is a long way!

The gun goes off, and we begin. Those nearer to the front, anyway. After a short while, there are hints of movement, but I am right at the back so mostly I just wait. Suddenly we are in herd mode – shuffling, bumping, pushing, falling. Slowly at first, then faster.

Strikes on Chapman’s peak mean the route is different this year and that we will run over Ou Kaapse Weg instead of Chappies. I’m sad because it’s my first Two Oceans, and I am missing one of the most iconic features of the race. It’s more ‘One Ocean One Mountain’ this year. But I’m grateful to be running regardless, and the reserve is beautiful.

We are picking up momentum now as we run down Main Road.  There is a slight drizzle, and it’s quite refreshing. It’s perfect weather for a PB, but today won’t be one of mine. We cruise through Wynberg and Plumstead, and I have to keep reminding myself not to go too fast. The road is straight for a long time, and we run past clusters of locals who cheer us on from the roadside. Some volunteers hand us sachets of water and Powerade. There are a few older folk on their stoeps, with Afrikaans pop music blaring in the background. It’s pretty early to be drinking, but that doesn’t seem to bother them, and they raise their glasses to us as we run past.

After about 17km, we wind around the corner onto a coastal section of road, and Muizenburg beach comes into sight. The rain has cleared a bit, and it’s a beautiful day. Longboarders hustle in the crowded surf as I bump into runners on the narrow street. I’m daydreaming now about surfing back at home, where the water is not so cold.

We hug the coastline and enjoy the ocean breeze as we wind around Trappies Kop and through Kalk Bay. Some musicians serenade us from their garage as we run past. They are carelessly playing their guitars and singing, and it’s a great distraction. A little further along I become aware of the houses built up against the hillside. A lady is dancing on the second floor of her home. Two Oceans spectators sit with drinks in hand on chairs on the balcony’s of neighbouring houses. Everyone is in a great mood! I can’t help but smile. This is South Africa at its best!

We run past some sea-facing shops at Fishhoek. Someone is playing a Beatenberg song from a PA system that has been set up on the roadside. At about 22km, we turn inland onto the M65. We wind through Sun Valley and prepare to face our demons. Ou Kaapse Weg is just ahead!

Up we go, first fast, then slow. The chatter dies down. It’s time to ‘dig deep’. Some runners have backpacks with Bluetooth speakers and shamelessly blast their favourite tracks to themselves and anyone else who will listen. The buses clog the road, and I get reprimanded by officials when I move outside of the beacons to try and overtake them. The camber only gets worse the higher up we go, and my legs burn.

We are in the nature reserve now, and there are no more water sachets. We get cups here instead, and there are large troughs to throw them into after we have used them. Suddenly everyone is a conservationist!  Amazingly, almost every single person complies, and I wonder why we can’t adopt the same attitude for the entire race, or any other road race.

Near the top of Ou Kaapse Weg, a lady shouts, “it’s just around the corner”, I reply that “it’s a very long corner” because it doesn’t look like we are going to be around anything any time soon. Eventually, we do crest the hill, and I take a few moments to take in the view and check in with myself before meandering down the other side.

We run past Pollsmoor Prison and a few water tables. At 40km we are in Tokai Forest. They’ve made some cool temporary water pipe contraptions to fill cups from, and I am enjoying the shade from all the trees. It’s a gradual, pleasant climb and then a steady flattish section through Fir Grove and Sillery.

At 46 km, just 10km before the end, we are reminded of the torment of Ou Kaapse Weg. We begin climbing up Southern Cross Drive towards Rhodes drive, and my legs are burning again. Most people are walking now and I turn away as a lady to my left bends over to be ill. I’m telling myself it’s “just two park runs to go”, and I keep running. That is if you could call it running. In reality, I am just ‘Madiba-shuffling’ up a hill at a rate slightly faster than the walkers. Exhausted, we reach Rhodes Drive and are presented with a short descent to recover on. People are holding signs that say things like, ‘you are running better than the government’. I enjoy this, because I know that I am not running well, and still that sign is true.

A few more ups and downs and we descend onto the UCT field. I use the last bit of my energy to speed up. I want to finish strong. I’ve had fun, but I am ready to sink a couple of cokes and pass out on a patch of grass somewhere. I am tired, and my body hurts, but I am in high spirits! Two Oceans did not disappoint. I will be back for you Chappies.

The Running Race!

By: Sandy Mullins

There is nothing quite like the homosapien species called the “athlete”! There are sub species in this category who hit the pavements, roads, and earthy terrain to “move it, move it”, namely the walker, runner and cyclist. They will get up at a ridiculous time – before the birds have decided to open their beaks, and lace up, leave the comfort of Duvet Street and move at a considerable pace along the streets and byways for a few hours, clicking up the kilometres (which is then beeped on the watch to the computer and downloaded to  record the mileage and rake up points!).

The beauty about the athlete is that it knows no boundaries. The love of the sport unites young and old, the doctor, the baker, the candlestick maker, and total strangers greet each other in passing, because they recognise the dedication and the unvoiced respect for what they are achieving. I remember running on the beachfront one morning with one of my race T-shirts on. A guy running in the opposite direction in a similar shirt smiled at me and the telepathy was – “I know what you went through to earn that T!”  

The bonds that are built along the road is strong. You might not know each other from a bar of soap, yet you can talk the same language. You share the pain, the anguish of injury or sickness, but delight in the achievements and goals reached, however great or small. Its not generally a selfish sport. What one gleans from one, is passed on to another to encourage and build and to see personal bests achieved. Its thanks to the selfless input of those in the know that has got me to places I would never have dreamt possible.

It is not necessarily a glamorous pastime. One sees each other at the worst, still with sleep in one’s eyes, hair amok, moods subdued or grumpy.  Not everyone looks like a super model in running gear. And when the need to go to the loo arises on the road… well put it this way, we would never dream that the bush could be such heaven! Its funny when you see runners in the mall all dressed for the day, how you almost don’t recognise them!

Seconders rate extremely high on my respect list. They get up with us to cart us around, provide for our needs on the way, and give us the rebuke or encouragement we need to get us going again. And don’t forget all the photos they take of us to record our amazing feats! Many have pulled me through some of the toughest challenges in my running career. Again total strangers come to the rescue. Comrades 2016, I was coming down Fields Hill having lost my electrolyte potions along the way, and the inevitable cramps kicked in – both calves. I looked like a ballerina on points – gone wrong! Two lovely spectators came running up and asked how they could help. I leant on one while the other helped undo the spasms. I really thought my race was over. Thanks to them I hobbled down towards Pinetown. Just then another runner doing his 9th came along side me and gave me a packet of the same electrolytes I had been taking. He told me to take two every half hour and then carried on his way to his green number. I tried to remember his name on his vest but to this day, I will never know who he is, but he saved my race and I was able to complete the challenge. Comradeship at its best. It is humbling.

So to all these crazy characters who make this world an interesting, better place – I salute you! Keep moving forward and run the race that is set before us – this is a paradigm of life!

Don’t be a litterbug, bitter cup!

By: Sandy Mullins

Calling all our Stella athletes to go green! We live in an environment that is marred by litter wherever we go. We see it when we run the streets and trails, and it would be so good to do our bit and be a part of the solution. 

Part of our road etiquette is to be aware of our surroundings and assist where possible, especially in races. There is so much littering with water sachets and coke containers, and though there are bins available, the mess that is left to clean up afterwards is unnecessary.  Sadly the wind also carries the litter into the surrounding areas and makes it difficult to clean up. 

When we are wearing our Stella kit, we are ambassadors of the club, and people recognize you by your colours. Let us not have a negative response but be known to be friendly, helpful and a club that cleans up after themselves!

Go green and gold, go Stella!!

Time Trial League 2019 

By: Michael Mostert

The 2019 Time Trial League kicks off on Thursday the 24th January 2019 @ 18h00 at the best athletic club, which is none other than Stella of course. We would love a big turnout in the Stella Kit for the different categories: senior men, veteran men, master’s men, Junior men, Junior women, Senior women and mixed walkers . The Stella mixed walkers team won the title in 2018 thanks to the participation of some dedicated ladies and gents.  We plan on keeping the trophy in 2019 and expect some serious competition from the other clubs this year.

The cost to participate in the League is R25.00 which covers all the time trial league fixtures for the year, which is good value for money. At an average of R2.50 per time trial, who needs Black Friday with a deal like this?

What we have emphasised to the Walkers who were daunted about time trial league is that it is all about team work. No matter how slow you may be, everyone is welcome. We exercise camaraderie, encouragement, and most of all team spirit and fun. Ladies and walkers do 4 or 5 km and men do 8 km (Ladies 8km option is still being been debated subject to vote and consensus from each club on how many ladies are keen to do the 8km. Please let me know so we can get the ball rolling).

So how do the points work? The finishing times of the first 4 club members in each category are added together and the best time gets the points followed by the 2nd best time and so forth….

If you don’t have a full team of 4, then the last finisher’s time is added. For example if Stella only has 2 senior men running at a time trial event, their times are added together and the times of the last runner home (twice). I know it’s not ideal but it does happen when we don’t have enough members running.

The first 4 runners/walkers over the finish line is calculated as Stella A the next 4 home are Stella B  etc. So it doesn’t matter if one Time Trial fixture you finish 8th and the next you finish 3rd. There is no definite A or B team. As I mentioned we are one Stella team. 

Feel free to ask me any questions and I will my best to answer them.

Looking forward to see more Stella vests at the time trial league in 2019

Stella Stars time trial team rocks!

Dedicated to team spirit,

Mike….

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